Monday, February 21, 2011

Defining Value Meanings



I am working on definitions for the Value Meanings. The meanings are cluster names from value elements mentioned by 3G consumers during the course of their interviews. The definitions are not saturated in a grounded theory sense, but do come from 2000 data points, of which 60% were about value meanings. Meanings are more inclusive (X includes A, B, C) than definitional (X means Y), and include oppositions (X contrasts with Y). Saturation is recommended in future work for emotion as a central concept and driver of value, and need, which seems particularly atomic. The diagram lines are not meaningful, but indicate primary and secondary colours. Connection between value meanings is unsubstantiated, though value elements combine value meanings to form new instances of value. For instance, safety combines duty, power, time, fun, community. Particularly difficult value elements are sexy and cool. Though I tend to think cool is just colloquial for good. Updates on the meanings to follow...

Draft definitions include:

1.Function: benefits as of a tool, something useful, with potential, including accessories, and contrasted with more frivolous use like fun.

2.Price: benefits and costs relating to payments, credit, bonus or free offers, including tax deductions.

3.Time: benefits and costs relating to convenience, quickness or timely service, and contrasted with delay, interruptions or lack of time.

4.Service/reliability: benefits including personalise, solutions, warranty, phone coverage and contrasted with problems.

5.Newness: including not previously known or used, something learned, or of interest, something important, relevant and with potential, and contrasted with the known, past, and the old.

6.Emotion: feeling or state derived from internal, external or social context, distinct from thoughts, including stress, love, surprise, trust, or excitement.

7.Need: including wants, desires, necessity, or necessary evil.

8.Simplicity; valuable benefits including something easy, with clarity, or certainty, lack of doubt or uncertainty.

9.Duty: including parental or familial, contractual commitments, and contrasted with choice, or own interests.

10.Power: includes control, potential, flexible, freedom and unlimited access to functions, while contrasted with limits.

11.Beauty: sensual benefits including aesthetics, colours, size, style, and looks.

12. Connection/community: social benefits of inclusion, including brand, status symbol, and contrasted with privacy.

Friday, February 11, 2011

What is Richard Ferrers up to?!


Does anyone on planet Earth...apart from Richie himself, actually know what Richie is up to??? In fact...does Richie even know?????

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Measuring Innovation in the Fortune 500





I have been examining movement in the Fortune 500, to identify innovation.

Looking at the Fortune 500 shows several groups of companies, including:

Steady performers:
IBM, Bank of America, Exxon, Microsoft, Boeing

Fast Fallers:
Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Halliburton, Altria

Fast Risers:
Apple, Amazon, L-3 Comms, CVS, Rite Aid, Murphy Oil

Slow Risers:
Nike

What this graph doesn't show is growth through acquisition. Such acquisitions would show as strong growth, when it is purchased rather than innovated growth. Apple is a standout for its growth, and Amazon seems two years behind. At&T has also grown significantly into the top 10, from the same time the iPhone came to market.

See Data Table.


See Graph below. The Graph shows the changing ranking of companies within the Fortune 500 (measured by revenue), and just some from each type of movement in the Top 200.
(1)Fast growers are diagonal downward lines to the right, while many companies especially big companies are steady.
Nike and Apple start at about the same place in 2006 (around 160) and Nike (in Pink) grows slowly, while Apple (in Orange) grows quickly. (2) Merrill Lynch (in dark blue) drops 100 spots in 2009 before disappearing. Lehman Bros dies while in the Top 50. (3) Amazon catches Google in 2010.